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OER Toolkit

Why should I use OER?

Below are some of the benefits of using OER.

  • To save students money.
  • To see students complete their course, and get better grades.
Benefits for Instructors
Benefits for Students
Benefits for Libraries
  • Increases student retention by reducing costs
  • Provide more relevant and engaging materials for your students (versatility)
  • Assures academic freedom to modify or add content to your specifications
  • Enhances your academic profile
  • Provides opportunity to collaborate
  • Gain ideas and inspiration, and further develop knowledge of your field.
  • Adds value to existing coursework
  • Fosters an open collegial culture through use of open resource
  • Can share innovations freely
  • Can be used for curriculum, educational activities and alternative/micro credentialing projects.
  • Low cost or free
  • Easy to find and access
  • More customised, relevant and current
  • Materials available in multiple formats
  • Potential increase in graduation and retention rates
  • Supports the library's effort to provide more relevant and engaging materials for students
  • Enables the role of library staff as collaborators on instructional design through their expertise in finding quality materials and knowledge of open licensing affordances
  • Expands the curatorial role of the library through enhanced opportunities for describing and organising content
  • Provides a mechanism to bridge the gap between historical library curation practices and the benefits of 21st century technologies

Why OER matter

Benefits for faculty and students 

Attribution: "Benefits for faculty and students" is a modified derivative of the poster “BCOER” by BCcampus licensed under CC BY 4.0

WSU Commitment to Sustainability

The use of OER supports the University commitment to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

Western Sydney University has responded to this commitment by identifying the SDG linkages to our CORE - Curriculum, Operations, Research and Engagement - framework. Underpinning this are the cross-cutting themes of education (SDG 4) and partnerships (SDG 17), as well as leadership.

In becoming an educational signatory to the SDSN Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Initiative, Western is committed to support and promote the principles of the SDGs through our teaching, research, campus operations and outreach.

Our curriculum work is aligned to SDG 4.7:

By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.

In becoming an educational signatory to the SDSN Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Initiative, Western is committed to support and promote the principles of the SDGs through our teaching, research, campus operations and outreach.

SDG Commitment:

In order to meet our SDG commitment, Western is working to ensure all our campuses and major programs are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Our campus operations are addressing different aspects of:

  • 6 – Clean water and sanitation.
  • 7 – Affordable and clean energy.
  • 11 – Sustainable cities and communities.
  • 12 – Responsible consumption and production.
  • 13 – Climate action.

In becoming an educational signatory to the SDSN Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Initiative, Western is committed to support and promote the principles of the SDGs through our teaching, research, campus operations and outreach.

SDG Commitment:

In order to meet our SDG commitment, Western is undertaking research that provides solutions to sustainable development challenges. Our researchers, institutes and centres are addressing different aspects of:

  • 3 – Good health and well-being.
  • 4 – Quality education.
  • 5 – Gender equality.
  • 7 – Affordable and clean energy.
  • 9 – Industry, innovation and infrastructure.
  • 10 – Reduced inequalities.
  • 11 – Sustainable cities and communities.
  • 12 – Responsible consumption and production.
  • 13 – Climate action.
  • 15 – Life on land.

We take a shared approach to engagement at Western Sydney, with many different divisions focusing on sustainability, access and equality. We engage both locally and internationally outside of the university through the our local school networks, community groups and partnerships, as well as through our global hub and RCE network.

SDG Commitment:

In order to meet our SDG commitment, Western is contributing to the achievement of the SDGs by ensuring our major programs are environmentally sustainable and socially inclusive. Our internal and outreach programs are addressing different aspects of:

  • 4 – Quality education.
  • 5 – Gender equality.
  • 10 – Reduced inequalities.
  • 17 – Partnerships for the goals.

In addition, the Library is committed to adding an A to the University's CORE committment - creating an ACORE framework for the Library.

In becoming an educational signatory to the SDSN Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Initiative, Western is committed to support and promote the principles of the SDGs through our teaching, research, campus operations and outreach.

Our curriculum affordable education work is aligned to SDG 4.3:

By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university.

© Western Sydney University, unless otherwise attributed.
Library guide created by Western Sydney University Library staff is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY)